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Addiction to Remission: Recovery Terminology to Know about Drugs and Alcohol

Posted by on Apr 18, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Addiction to Remission: Recovery Terminology to Know about Drugs and Alcohol

When working on your substance use issues, you’ll encounter some recovery terminology you may not know yet. A lot of the terms sound similar but have quite different meanings. Read on to learn more about what industry professionals mean when they use them, and how they apply to your journey. The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is one of the resources used to compile this list of terminology. It is an authority in the world of addiction medicine, and also acknowledges that terminology is always changing, so is a good current frame of reference. Addiction ASAM’s short definition of addiction is: “Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry.” Not everyone subscribes to the concept of addiction being a disease, however the physical impact on the brain is often very real. Our brains can be rewired many times over, and addiction is a very capable electrician. It is also important to note here that certain characteristics must be present to confirm a true addiction. A quick test is the Three C’s, compulsion, control, and consequences. Compulsion is the obsessive behaviour preceding using (i.e. daydreaming about next use). Control is what happens after using (i.e. no control to set limits, engaging in unhealthy behaviour in order to use). Consequences are what truly seals the addiction definition. Continuing to use even after being faced with negative consequences like losing a job, family, or having trouble with the police. Recovery “A process of sustained action that addresses the biological, psychological, social and spiritual disturbances inherent in addiction.” Recovery is the journey to remission. Whether the client is in outpatient or inpatient treatment, the work they are putting in is their recovery. Recovery is not a linear journey but it is the “sustained action” that counts. Remission “A state of wellness where there is an abatement of signs and symptoms that characterize active addiction.” In a disease model, remission means the disease is out of the system and is no longer causing concern, like when someone goes into remission from cancer. Therefore, this is the word used to demonstrate that a client is now functioning like a person without an addiction. Relapse “A process in which an individual who has established abstinence or sobriety experiences recurrence of signs and symptoms of active addiction, often including resumption of the pathological pursuit of reward and/or relief through the use of substance and other behaviours.” Relapse can be very disheartening, however, it is very common. Just like learning to ride a bike, a client should expect a few falls along the way. The client is learning healthy behaviours and making huge life changes to get to a remission state. As mentioned above, the most important thing is to get back on the recovery journey and keep trying. Abstinence “Intentional and consistent restraint from the pathological pursuit of reward and/or relief that involves the use of substances and other behaviours.” Abstinence is promoted by numerous organizations and is the crux of many philosophies. However, abstinence as a concept really does not hold up under scientific scrutiny. Abstinence sees the drug as the problem and the reason for the addiction. If this were true, however, everyone who drank alcohol or tried a drug would become addicted. It has been proved many times over...

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Help Finding Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Ontario

Posted by on Apr 16, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Help Finding Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Ontario

This month, learn how to access public drug and alcohol treatment in Ontario in the next installment of  Provincial Snapshot. Each month, we are outlining the steps you must take to access public drug and alcohol treatment in each province. This blog will detail how to access different levels of addiction and mental health care. If you or someone you know requires urgent help, please call 911. Drug and Alcohol Helpline If you have substance use problems, Ontario is one of the best provinces to be in! The province has set up a drug and alcohol helpline that is available 24/7 free of charge. Call to be connected with an information and referral specialist who is knowledgeable on all things public drug and alcohol treatment in Ontario. They can provide up to date information on treatment providers, crisis lines, self-help groups, distress centers, and family services. This includes giving you your closest outpatient office, detox clinic, or health unit. A special feature about this helpline is that they can provide current wait times for all provincially run facilities, giving you a good idea of what your immediate options are. The only thing to note is that this helpline only deals with Ontario and its publicly-funded options. Therefore, all the advice they give is for OHIP-funded facilities. This is a really good start, but if you are looking for private options as well, give our specialist a call and they can give you all the other options. Many Options to Access Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Ontario You may not need to go to an outpatient office like in other provinces for a referral to treatment. In Ontario, you can often get a referral from your family physician if they have a documented history of your mental health or substance use concerns. Addiction Supportive Housing (ASH) is a program designed for clients who have tried addiction treatment programs before and need some extra help transitioning to ‘real life’. Some clients may have tried a few times, but have not been able to make their recovery stick. Others may be at risk of homelessness and need a safe and supportive environment to continue their recovery. If a potential client is assessed as having a high probability of a successful recovery in this style of supportive housing treatment program they can be admitted. There are many ASH houses across the province, you can contact the previously mentioned helpline here to find your closest ASH program. If you are looking for public drug and alcohol treatment in Ontario and need some assistance, please contact our specialist. Be sure to check out the page on Toronto drug rehab and alcohol treatment programs. References: Drug and Alcohol Helpline ASH Program The post Help Finding Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Ontario appeared first on Canada Drug...

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Alcohol Awareness Month: Targeting Underage Drinking

Posted by on Apr 12, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Alcohol Awareness Month: Targeting Underage Drinking

This year’s theme for Alcohol Awareness Month is Changing Attitudes: It’s not a ‘rite of passage’ in an effort to curb underage drinking. Since 1987, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) in the USA has hosted Alcohol Awareness Month every April. It’s important to note that NCADD was founded by an Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) proponent. This means their focus is on abstinence and directing to teaching teens to say no to alcohol. During awareness months, NCADD spearheads events to educate the public on the prevention and treatment of alcoholism. This year they will be specifically helping parents in how to talk to their children and teens about the impact alcohol can have on their lives. Underage Drinking Underage drinking is considered one of the biggest public health problems in the USA. Alcohol is still the most used intoxicant by young people. 33% of 15-year-olds have had at least one drink, and 60% of 18 years olds have had at least one drink. A hidden danger is that while youth drink less frequently than adults, they consume 90% of their alcohol during binge drinking periods. Binge drinking is defined as 5 standard drinks for men and 4 standard drinks for women within a few hours. Keep in mind, most people don’t consume a standard drink. A standard drink contains 14 grams of pure alcohol which looks like a 12 ounce of beer with a 5% alcohol content or a 5-ounce glass of wine with 12% alcohol. How many people do you know who measure out 5 ounces of wine when they pour a glass? Even restaurants have a 6 or 9-ounce option when ordering wine, which instantly takes you over a standard drink. Prevention and Alcohol Treatment The age-old saying Monkey See Monkey Do is a saying for a reason. We are heavily influenced by our environment, especially during childhood. Children of alcoholics are between 4 and 10 times more likely to have alcohol use problems later in life than children with no close relatives who struggle with alcohol. However, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) in the US offers scientific methods for underage drinking prevention. These include environmental interventions, individual-level interventions, school-based interventions, and family-based interventions. Environmental refers to making alcohol harder to get through laws and enforcement, which isn’t really something parents can control. However, the other three interventions are all variations of being involved in the child’s life. For example, making sure they are educated about alcohol and getting them involved in fun, sober activities. If you would like to learn more, the resources referenced here are linked below. Additionally, if you are concerned about a child or teen in your life, please contact our specialist here to learn about available resources near you. This website serves as your gateway to information on drug rehab and alcohol treatment programs in Canada, from Toronto drug rehab programs to Vancouver alcohol treatment programs, etc. References: NIAAA: Underage Drinking NIAAA: Why do adolescents drink, What are the risks, and How can underage drinking be prevented? NCADD: Alcohol Awareness Month   The post Alcohol Awareness Month: Targeting Underage Drinking appeared first on Canada Drug...

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Drug Fact Sheet: Fentanyl and Carfentanyl

Posted by on Apr 9, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Drug Fact Sheet: Fentanyl and Carfentanyl

Fentanyl and carfentanyl belong to the group of drugs known as opioids. They are currently both in the news in relation to the “opioid crisis” that is gripping North America, both Canada and the United States. Fentanyl was created for human use, while carfentanyl was only ever intended for large animal use like elephants. However, these substances are both being found in illicit drugs being marketed as heroin, MDMA, or cocaine. During Prohibition times in the USA, bootleggers used more and more unsafe chemicals in their alcohol to keep costs down and potency up. As the war on drugs continues in North America today, drug dealers are turning to substances that are stronger and cost less to manufacture. Police warn that street drugs are almost never what the dealer says, let alone a pure version. Fentanyl Fentanyl is approximately 100 times stronger than morphine and is prescribed for severe chronic pain. It is a depressant, meaning it slows the messages traveling between the brain and the physical body, which is why it helps alleviate pain symptoms. However, an overdose of fentanyl means its depressant qualities are heightened, leading to a relaxing of muscles in control of automatic functions like breathing. Carfentanyl Carfentanyl or carfentanil was first synthesized in 1974 as a variation (also known as an “analogue”) of fentanyl. It is the strongest commercial opioid, 100 times stronger than fentanyl, 5000 times stronger than heroin, and 10,000 times stronger than morphine. Carfentanyl affects the human body at only 1 microgram. It is used as a general anesthetic for large animals. The strongest fentanyl analogue designed for human use is sufentanil which is approximately 10 – 20 times less potent than carfentanyl. One shot of Naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal medication, is usually all that is needed for a heroin overdose. However, an overdose involving carfentanyl can take more than half a dozen shots of Naloxone to overcome. A dose of carfentanyl the size of a grain of rice can kill a human. Due to the intense toxicity of this substance, authorities consider it a possible biological weapon. In 2016, the Mounties seized a kilogram of carfentanyl in Vancouver that, due its purity, had the potential to kill 50 million people, more than our entire Canadian population. A spokesperson for the RCMP said when the police seize regular street drugs like cocaine and heroin the intent for the shipment is known. However, because carfentanyl is so potent, large shipments could mean much more sinister motives. Fentanyl and carfentanyl are some of the most toxic substances a human can ingest. If you are concerned about what could be in your drugs and are looking to make a change, contact our specialist for help and resources. This website is a resource of drug rehab and alcohol treatment programs throughout Canada – from Vancouver to Toronto, Calgary to Ottawa, and everywhere in between. Rehab from drugs and alcohol addiction is possible. References Alcohol and Drug Foundation: Fentanyl PubChem: Carfentanil Guardian: Alarm After Canada Carfentanil Bust CBC: Deadly Opioid Carfentanil Bound for Calgary Seized in Vancouver The post Drug Fact Sheet: Fentanyl and Carfentanyl appeared first on Canada Drug...

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Vancouver Mayor Calls for Decriminalization to Combat Overdose Deaths

Posted by on Apr 4, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Mayor Robertson Concerned About Overdose Deaths Following the release of the number of overdose deaths across the country, Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson is calling for the decriminalization of personal drug use and possession. He has long looked at drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal justice issue. His recent announcement comes on the heels of learning that the opioid overdose crisis is killing an average of one person a day in his city. “This is not getting better and it’s time for more disruptive and more innovative action to save lives” said Robertson during an interview on March 28th. The Mayor did not say police should ignore petty drug use, however did say he was in discussions with Chief of Police Adam Palmer. The Vancouver Police Department stated they have a “progressive drug policy that does not target individual drug users unless that drug use interferes with public safety”.   How Could Decriminalization in Vancouver Work? Decriminalization is a hot button topic right now. However, the terms decriminalization and legalization are often used interchangeably despite important differences. Decriminalization means no criminal penalties would apply to those found with small amounts of illicit drugs, however may be subject to an administrative penalty such as a fine. The manufacture and distribution of illicit drugs remains illegal and unregulated under decriminalization. The Global Commission on Drug Policy, as well as the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition recommend the idea of a “sanctuary city” as a way for cities to de facto decriminalize personal drug use and possession. Trialing a concept like this could be perfect for BC as the province has often been an innovator in drug policy. It has been almost 2 years since the April 16, 2016 declaration of a public health emergency in BC due to the amount of overdoses and deaths. Since then, as the Mayor said, the opioid crisis has only worsened. As the number of overdose deaths for 2017 are being tallied, it seems set to out pace 2016 by 30%. An estimated 4000 Canadians lost their lives to overdoses, almost double motor-vehicle crash fatalities. Nearly 10% of these overdose deaths happened in Vancouver. It is evident something needs to change as the current tactics have done nothing to slow the death rate. If you have a friend or family member who needs help, please contact our specialist.   References: Vancouver Mayor Calls for Drug Decriminalization After Record Year for Opioid Overdoses The Escalating Toll: 2017 set to be Worst Year in Canada for Overdoses Provincial Health Officer Declares Public Health Emergency Safe Injection Sites a Possibility for Waterloo Area The post Vancouver Mayor Calls for Decriminalization to Combat Overdose Deaths appeared first on Canada Drug...

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The Connection Between Diet and Depression

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

The Connection Between Diet and Depression

Easter means chocolate around the house for the next few weeks, but did you know chocolate could lead to increased depression symptoms? In 2015, a study on nutritional medicine in the field of psychiatry was published in The Lancet scientific journal. Backed by a number of physicians, psychiatrists, and scientists, this study asserted that as much as diet is known to influence the health of a person’s cardio, endocrine, and gastrointestinal health, its impact on psychiatry is now indisputable. This group of academics advocates the “recognition of diet and nutrition as central determinants of both physical and mental health.” Modified Mediterranean Diet Study In 2017, a co-author of the aforementioned study, Dr. Felice Jacka published the results of her study The SMILES Trial. This trial followed 67 men and women who had a clinical diagnosis of moderate to severe depression and who reported eating a relatively unhealthy diet. Half were required to eat a healthy modified Mediterranean diet and attend dietary support sessions with a nutritionist. The other participants ate the same as they had previously but added social support sessions. The modified Mediterranean diet participants in this 12-week study all lowered their depression scores, with 32% going into remission. The participants who ate the same as before did improve but only 8% entered remission. Important to note is that caloric intake was not restricted, so the Mediterranean diet participants did not lose weight. What is a modified Mediterranean diet? It emphasizes real food essentially: whole grains, fruit, vegetables, legumes, low-fat dairy, raw nuts, lean protein, and olive oil. There are a number of factors that may contribute to the success of this diet in combating depression. Refined carbohydrates, found in sugar and flour, are responsible for mood destabilization by creating highs and lows in the levels of blood sugar, insulin, and hormones. Additionally, good fats and oils found in nuts and lean protein are essential for healthy brain functions. Depression Tackled in Baby Steps Depression is hard to shake because it robs a person of their motivation or ability to change things like diet. Almost a chicken and egg scenario, when they are depressed they gravitate towards comfort foods that are usually high in refined sugar and carbohydrates, saturated and trans fats, and salt, like cookies, pizza, and chips. This sort of food contributes to depression, thereby continuing this vicious cycle. If you or someone you know is struggling with severe depression and a healthy diet switch is not in the cards currently, starting with traditional methods like therapy and or medication is great. With professional counseling and medication, a person’s mental health may improve enough to feel ready to tackle their eating habits. If you are looking for further mental health resources, please contact our specialist for help. References: The Lancet: Nutritional medicine as mainstream in psychiatry ABC: How diet can affect mental health: the likely link between food and the brain Harvard Health: Diet and depression Psychology Today: Clinical trial finds diet works for depression The post The Connection Between Diet and Depression appeared first on Canada Drug...

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Current Government Approach to Mental Health and Addiction Treatment in Saskatchewan

Posted by on Mar 27, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Current Government Approach to Mental Health and Addiction Treatment in Saskatchewan

Every month we look at another province, and what their provincial government’s approach to mental health and addictions is. This month we are looking at Saskatchewan, but it is posing as a unique challenge. Saskatchewan released a 10-year mental health and addictions plan for the province in 2014. However, it is now in the process of dissolving its 12 health authorities into one singular health authority for the province. Will this have an impact on the province’s ability to deliver on its action plan points? Read on for an in-depth look at the 10-year action plan and how the government hopes to improve mental health and addiction treatment in Saskatchewan. Working Together for Change: A 10 Year Mental Health and Addictions Action Plan for Saskatchewan Working Together for Change was commissioned by the provincial government in 2013 to create a 10-year mental health and addictions plan for Saskatchewan. The report was delivered to the health minister in December 2014 and had seven main recommendations to improve mental health and addiction treatment in Saskatchewan. Enhance access and capacity and support recovery in the community.Services need to be made easier to find and a comprehensive list needs to be kept up to date. The report suggests promoting the use of HealthLine so those who need its services can find it. A big part of this recommendation is increasing access for people living in rural areas. In order to provide timely treatment, the recommendation suggests online clinical treatments, as well as mobile services. Focus on prevention and early interventionThe report stresses the importance of community-based organizations for prevention like youth drop-in centres and preschool programs. As well as pushing for more programs to address alcohol misuse, suicide prevention, and general mental health awareness. Create person and family centred and coordinated servicesSimilar to the existing Patient First method, the report emphasizes the need to centre the person with the lived experience. To get people help when they need it, no matter where they asked, training for all frontline providers will allow people to access treatment quicker. This should also aid in those with more than one need get help across service sectors. Respond to diversitiesIncreasing cultural awareness training so those in vulnerable populations like newcomers to Canada or LGBT people are able to gain access in a respectful environment. Partner with first nations and Metis peoplePartnering with First Nations and Metis people is the best way to coordinate and deliver mental health and addictions services. Steps must also be taken to ensure a constant dialogue and incorporation of traditional and holistic care models. Reduce stigma and increase awarenessSimilar to the previous two recommendations, sensitivity training and developing an awareness program are the suggested next steps. Transform the system and sustain the changeCollaboration between departments with shared future goals and commitment is a must for any sustained change. The report also recommends public and private sectors work together to create both employment and housing options. Moving Forward The report was released at the end of 2014. Then Minister of Health, Dustin Duncan, endorsed the report and reinforced the government’s commitment to improving services. Between 2007 and 2014 funding for mental health services had increased over 30%.  Hopefully, the recent changeover in health authorities does not bury these recommendations for increased mental health and addiction...

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Outpatient, Inpatient, Rehab, and Detox: What Do They Actually Mean?

Posted by on Mar 19, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Outpatient, Inpatient, Rehab, and Detox: What Do They Actually Mean?

The terminology used in rehab treatment brochures and online can be confusing if you are not familiar with the industry. We have compiled a few commonly used terms here in an effort to make accessing treatment and other resources easier. Outpatient and Inpatient Outpatient and inpatient treatment programs are similar in that they both use group therapy. Some of these support groups are evidence-based and others are faith-based like 12-step programs. While programs vary, many utilize other treatments like individual counselling, education, family support, and medical care. Almost all those struggling with substance use will begin their journey at an outpatient office. Here a staff member will assess the person to see if inpatient care is necessary. Outpatient – A person with substance use issues lives at home and accesses care at an outpatient office in their community. These offices might be a mental health clinic, hospital clinic, health unit, or a private counsellor. Outpatient programs are great for those early in their substance use struggles, those who can’t afford inpatient programs, or those who want to stay in their community and not leave their job or family. Inpatient – The client lives at an inpatient treatment facility. Sometimes this facility is part of a hospital or special clinic, but is often a specialized drug and alcohol rehabilitation centre. At this type of facility, individuals stay in a facility for a certain period of time and participate in treatment and activities during the days and evenings. Stays at an inpatient facility can range from one week to more than a month. Detox and Rehab Detox – Detox, short for detoxification, is not necessary for everyone with substance use issues. It is not simply ceasing using substances. The Centre for Substance Abuse Treatment definition is as follows, “detoxification is a set of interventions aimed at managing acute intoxication and withdrawal. It denotes a clearing of toxins from the body of the patient who is acutely intoxicated and/or dependent on substances of abuse. Detoxification seeks to minimize the physical harm caused by the abuse of substances.” Some levels of addiction mean a client cannot safely detox alone or without access to medical care. There are different kinds of detox clinics, some that provide medical care and others that do not. Please consult a healthcare professional before attempting to detox alone. Rehab – Rehab has become a colloquial term so much now that it has almost lost its true meaning. Rehab is short for rehabilitation, which refers to an inpatient residential drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility. Many people think their loved one who struggles with drugs or alcohol must go to rehab, but that is often not the case. Many can succeed through outpatient programs. If you or a loved one requires more help navigating inpatient, outpatient, detox, or rehab options, please contact our specialist here. References: Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment for a Substance Use Problem Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment The post Outpatient, Inpatient, Rehab, and Detox: What Do They Actually Mean? appeared first on Canada Drug...

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How to Have a Fun, Dry St. Patrick’s Day

Posted by on Mar 15, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

How to Have a Fun, Dry St. Patrick’s Day

St Patrick’s Day is considered a drinking holiday in today’s society, which can be hard to participate in when you do not drink. There are many responses these days to this idea of St Patrick’s Day being intrinsically tied to alcohol. Patriotic Irish groups and sober groups have made their own celebrations for anyone wanting to celebrate a dry day. The #1 rule for success is preparation! Plan ahead what you are doing for the day and who you will be with. Making sure you already have sober plans makes it much easier to decline drinking invitations and remain accountable. For the Irish Sober St. Patrick’s Day is an organization started in New York by William Reilly who proposed the idea to community leaders in addiction recovery and Irish Americans. Since 2012, it has been an annual event held on the same day as the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York City. There are now events in both the USA and Ireland. The mission statement of the organization is “to reclaim the true spirit of the day and to change the perception and experience of what St Patrick’s Day can be by providing family-friendly, alcohol-free events that celebrate the depth of Irish culture, as well as year-round educational and cultural activities.” For the Reveler College campuses in North America have become notorious for binge drinking and hard partying. St Patrick’s Day is no exception. Universities and colleges always have a variety of clubs and societies and now that there are sober and recovery societies, dry St. Patrick’s Day events are popping up. Keep an eye out in the weeks leading up to the day as many recovery groups will also host get-togethers. Being around those also focused on their personal recovery creates a safe atmosphere where you can begin to make new St. Patty’s memories. For the Self Starter Thanks to the Internet, fun shirts like “Kiss Me, I’m Irish and Sober” are available, making avoiding beers easier. Hosting a dry party at home will create a safe and fun atmosphere for yourself and others. If you don’t want to host, make sure you have some kind of plan. Declining drinking event invitations takes practice, but is vital for recovery longevity. Your friends should be understanding of your desire to avoid unnecessarily triggering situations. References: Sober St Patrick’s Day How to have a sober St Patrick’s Day 6 tips to help ensure a sober St Patrick’s Day The post How to Have a Fun, Dry St. Patrick’s Day appeared first on Canada Drug...

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Help Finding Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Saskatchewan

Posted by on Mar 12, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments

Help Finding Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Saskatchewan

This month, learn how to access public drug and alcohol treatment in Saskatchewan in the next installment of  Provincial Snapshot. Each month, we are outlining the steps you must take to access public drug and alcohol treatment in each province. This blog will detail how to access different levels of addiction and mental health care. If you or someone you know requires urgent help, please call 911.   Early Access to Treatment The four main types of publicly available treatment in Saskatchewan are outpatient, detox, inpatient, and long-term residential services. Outpatient treatment is your first port of call and clinics are found all over the province. At an outpatient clinic or agency, staff will help you with assessment, one on one and group counseling, and general education. A detox facility is a safe environment for those with more advanced substance use issues to undergo withdrawal from substances. A detox usually lasts 7-10 days and clients will be given resources to aid in furthering their road to recovery. Detox facilities are located in La Ronge, Lloydminster, Meadow Lake, Moose Jaw, Prince Albert, Regina, and Saskatoon. If you are too far away from one of these cities, you must get a medical referral. This allows you to go to your closest hospital or health unit for medically assisted detox/supervised withdrawal. The health unit should also be able to liaise with outpatient and residential programs. They often have social workers on staff who will help get you set up with assistance and/or referrals.   Continuing Care for Severe Substance Use Continuing treatment can mean being admitted into an inpatient facility. Similar to outpatient where the client receives counseling and other activities, it is more intensive and the clients live at the facility. These programs last around four weeks and are available in Ile-a-la-Crosse, Indian Head, La Ronge, Lloydminster, Prince Albert, Saskatoon, and Regina. Long-term residential services offer longer stays than inpatient and also include life skills training. This provides a better base for success for clients once they have left treatment.   Remote Care If you live rurally and do not believe you will be able to access in-person treatment, consider using HealthLine 811. This 24/7 service is free, confidential, and available to anyone in Saskatchewan. Dial 811 on your phone and you will be connected with “registered psychiatric nurses, registered nurses and social workers who can offer crisis support and strategies to someone in a mental health crisis.” HealthLine 811 services are also available online here. Another online way to find your closest outpatient, inpatient, detox, or other addiction service is by visiting the Saskatchewan government’s map of health care facilities. There are search filters you can use to find the most accurate result. If you or a loved one need more help accessing public drug and alcohol treatment in Saskatchewan, please contact our specialist here. References: Alcohol and Drug Services HealthLine Mental Health and Addictions Action Plan Newsletter Health Care Facilities The post Help Finding Public Drug and Alcohol Treatment in Saskatchewan appeared first on Canada Drug...

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Where Addicts are Treated Like Human Beings